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Glassetonbury, Vol. 6: Sweet Sixteen

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Our first round of Glassetonbury, Vol. 6 is in the books, and sixteen songs remain in our competition. These artists will continue to face off against each other in week-long rounds, where you have the power to vote your favorites onward to victory. The artists who make our Final Four will earn a permanent spot in our Glassetonbury: Hall of Fame playlist, while the winner will also receive a featured interview on our front page, a livestream/fan Q&A hosted by us on Instagram Live, and more.

Let’s take a look at our new bracket:



Each matchup below will feature links to the songs, a brief description of each song and artist, and a poll for you to vote on. Voting will close on April 3rd at 1:00 p.m. CST and is limited to one vote per 24 hours. To prevent botting, we equip all of our polls with CAPTCHA protection, and while this is a necessary step to preserve the integrity of the tournament, sometimes this can lead to problems when people try to vote on multiple polls in one round. To ensure that your votes are properly counted, refresh the page before voting on a new poll, and make sure to click “Vote” again after you pass the CAPTCHA protection. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

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Cry Over You” — Julia Gomez vs. “The Boost” — Cee Nario

A big, bold melody congealed with infectious lyrics for Julia Gomez’s “Cry Over You”. It’s the kind of upbeat track a bunch of girlfriends might get together and blast after their friend finished a nasty breakup. Icona Pop came to ear most readily. It defeated “k (all i got to say)” by NUVILICES last round. Meanwhile, Cee Nario’s funky R&B rhythm flowed as smoothly as classic Bruno Mars for “The Boost.” This social-justice party anthem sparks unified hope amid dire circumstances for black and brown populations. It defeated “Sinking Through the Sky” by Brig Aurora last round.

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Lost Without You” — Tim Gallagher vs. “GOLDEN LORD” — JxStill

Recognized as a romantic singer-songwriter — as evidenced by songs featured on shows like Love Island — Tim Gallagher poured his heart out on “Lost Without You”. A soulful letter penned to his recent lover, much in the distraught vein of Freya Ridings’ twin-titled track. It defeated “Inside Out” by When the Sun Sets last round. Meanwhile, if a 90’s West Coast gangster rapper like Snoop Dogg had come up in today’s relatively peaceful street scene, then infused his sound with Lana Del Rey’s breathy voice, one might come close to experiencing the midnight vibe of JxStill, exemplified by “Golden Lord.” It defeated “Last One Left” by Quake Matthews and Owen “O’Sound” Lee last round.

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Swimming” — Sprints vs. “So Long, I Guess” — Self-Help

In-your-face garage noise band SPRINTS, in possession of vitriolic energy that could boost any protest playlist, hit hard and heavy, a la The Dropkick Murphys. Their unapologetically rebellious intensity took aim at economic turmoil instigated by the powers that be. It defeated “Drunk” by Alexander Jean last round. Meanwhile, Self-Help popped in the listener’s ear with a selfless aim to give a loving goodbye to an important person in her life. It’s the kind of parting one could see having occurred on the rainy patio of a Parisian cafe, conducted with poetic somberness matched by Alison Sudol. It defeated “Used To This” by Joe Daccache last round.

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Green Light” — Burying Giants vs. “Swim” — Lazyrevs

Folksy Burying Giants, building on the work of Nick Drake, ambled toward the listener as if having trekked from a parallel universe devoid of space and time. He offers an ever-sweeping landscape that gave him the opportunity to craft this poetic diary entry, entitled “Green Light.” It defeated “At Arm’s Length” by Sarah Cicero last round. Meanwhile, Irish Lazyrevs’ latest single “Swim” hit listeners’ hearts as hauntingly romantic as the unknown life lived at seafloor’s abyss. It’s a refreshingly subdued, marine-inspired ballad that’d throw a Celtic twist into the more tender tracks of Sara Bareilles. It defeated “Drink Water” by Josiah Soren last round.

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Beautiful Desperation” — Goldpark vs. “How Did We?” — Victor Solf

If Bruce Springsteen had led the E Street Band on an alternative rock path, listeners would’ve heard Goldpark’s unique sound in 1972. These Nashville rockers channeled “The Boss” with “Beautiful Desperation,” which leaned into natural enchantment’s inseparability from struggle. It defeated “Batman & Robin” by 730 BuggOut last round. Meanwhile, a listener would be hard-pressed to stop their toe-tapping and head-bobbing to “How Did We” from Victor Solf. Catchy as all get-out, this soulful electronic song might’ve sunk through one’s headphones like Justin Timberlake if he’d been produced by Motown. It defeated “IDC Anymore” by Yoe Mase last round.

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 “Waves and Walls” — Huxley Sun vs. “Modystly” — Modyst

A nuanced indie-folk song called “Waves and Walls” came out recently from Polish performer Huxley Sun. With immersive, intimate movement in the background, Sun captured a swelling tension that may draw comparisons to Bon Iver. It defeated “Reliance” by King Quice last round. Meanwhile, underground hip-hop artist Modyst dropped a nod to his namesake for “Modystly”. Modyst spat bars for ninety seconds straight, establishing a respect-commanding presence as efficiently as Dr. Dre. It offers slickly slung rhymes to warrant fellow Oaklanders’ pridefully-tilted chins. It defeated “Perspective” by Natty Reeves last round.

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Cornered” — Mylo Bybee vs. vs. “After the Alley” — Chris Howard

Boise brothers by a combination of blood and band, Mylo Bybee rocked out on “Cornered.” Imbued with subtle rage, the song’s power snuck up on the listener with ferocity similar to that of Foster the People. It defeated “A Woman In This World” by madii last round. Meanwhile, Chris Howard melded soul and jazz on “After the Alley,” a track chock full of stacked background vocals and tasty keys riffs. In the song, he expertly captured the manic symptoms expected of one engaging in the dangerous behavior alluded. It calls to mind an edgier John Mayer promoting the sexy side of addiction, if you will. It defeated “Same Kids” by Chick last round.

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Naym_Brnd” — S.I.N. (Survival In Negativity) x B.Positiv vs. “Bigger Than Me” — Gretta Ray

S.I.N. and B. Positiv reframed a media-skewed conversation that prioritizes conformity. “Naym_Brnd” utilized spoken-word to negate a fear of missing out in favor of following one’s heart. It’s a faster-paced, updated testament to what Langston Hughes started. It defeated “No Interview” by Lover BoyLex Bratcher, and NAR last round. Meanwhile, like Florence Welch’s well-crafted analogies that embrace disorienting imagery, Gretta Ray became Alice tumbling down the rabbit hole to Wonderland. “Bigger Than Me” confidently reminded listeners to engage with the impossible; it’s worth being thrown off-kilter. It defeated “Gold (Unplugged)” — Firewoodisland last round.

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Don’t forget to follow our official Glassetonbury Spotify playlist below!

This bracket was made with help from Casey Fitzmaurice.

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